Thursday, May 17, 2018

Just...Hell.

Y'all, I'm just too pissed and sad tonight to write much.
The dog who killed a bunch of my chickens last year got out of his yard again today and although he did not kill any of my hens, Mick is torn up. He's lost all of his tail feathers and his back end is bloody. He valiantly defended his ladies and we'll treat him tonight with golden seal and Neosporin and hope for the best.

Fuck.









32 comments:

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    1. Well, I'm not completely irrational. I know that this is JUST a chicken. But as Glen told the owner of the dog tonight, just as they have chosen to have dogs as pets, we have chosen to have chickens. And we care for them as they care for their dogs. I'm so proud of Mick. I am going to hope for the best. He deserves it.

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  2. OH NO, I sure hope Mick will be okay. That dog needs to go ~ why does he keep getting away with this?

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    1. Because no one can keep a dog from escaping every minute of every day, no matter how hard they try. And when that dog has learned to kill chickens, that is the first thing he will do if he does escape.
      I've slathered Mick up with comfrey ointment mixed with golden seal and antibiotic cream. He couldn't even get up into the roost box. We'll do our best to take care of that brave boy.

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    2. You are a heartfelt healer, Mary. Mick knows he’s in good hands.

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  3. I am continually amazed at what the birds can recover from... That being said chicken killers don't fair well up here. Plus we have dog wardens that the the neighbor confronting aspect away...We just had to deal with a raccoon that was waking early every day, a bit of a scruffy specimen that was just trying to get ahead, but my bird yard isn't the place. Catch and release of pest animals is illegal here but we don't want to kill them either....

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    1. The problem with the catch and release of pest animals is that they can spread diseases to new populations and also, the animals have no connection with a new area and will find their ways back if at all possible. It sounds good but it doesn't really work and it's illegal here, too, although we have caught and released a few snakes.
      I wish we had a dog warden.

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  4. That's just awful and I'm so sorry. Poor Mick. I hope he'll be okay.

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    1. He's hanging in there, Jennifer. Thank you.

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  5. I'm an avid dog lover, but when a dog is uncontrollable and kills others' pets, it needs to be put down. Those neighbors need to know that. Be well, Mick!!!

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    1. They do know it but they seem to believe that their dog is of far more value or something than my chickens. They've told us they are not going to put him down and they tried to rehome him but couldn't. So. Not sure where that leaves us.

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  6. having had chickens for years myself........and having dogs ........AND the neighbors (bad) dogs.......I feel your sadness and frustration. Hoping Mick the Valiant recovers from his wounds. What a sweet and devoted roo he is. May he heal quickly
    Susan M

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    1. That you, Susan. I know that it's just the dog's nature in this case but that doesn't mean I have to tolerate it.
      Mick is pretty amazing.

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  7. Sending good wishes for both you and Mick...

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  8. Some dogs have that strong prey drive and their owners have to be ever more vigilent than those dogs that don’t. One of my dogs is that way. Just goes quickly for the neck. And he’s fast. Cats, squirrels, rabbits and ithervsmall creatures in my yard are toast. The other dog would not hurt any creature. We have kept him from getting loose for 2 years now and these stories renew our vigilance. He’s a very sweet dog to all people and other dogs but small fast moving creatures just set him off. It’s inherent in some breeds and dogs.

    We have trained our dog to ignore our cousins free range chickens in her yard when we visit her with the dogs. He actually can go in the yard among THOSE chickens and leave them alone. But a random cat flitting in his sights or other creature, sets him off despite continuous training that way. The bolt and prey instinct he has, we cannot extinguish though he can be inured to constant presence of chickens in her yard. Just as he is, to cats in certain people’s houses.

    Good wishes for Mick and you, the wonderful chicken whisperer. He did his duty; partly why there are roosters in the flock. I love your vignettes though this one made me sad

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    1. Yeah. It's true. It's just so inbred in some dogs and they were probably bred that way on purpose to help keep rodents and small predators at bay. The problem here, as you know, is that even the most diligent of owners cannot possibly guarantee that their dog will never get away from them and in this case, that dog knows exactly where it wants to go and what it wants to do. And that would be my yard to kill chickens. The whole situation sucks.

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  9. Oh Mary...I'm sorry to hear this. What a valiant little chicken Mick is! XXOO

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    1. He's such a good, good rooster man.

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  10. Oh no!!! I'm so sorry! I hope Mick pulls through, and I know you'll keep us posted.

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    1. I honestly think he will heal but I'm not sure he'll ever walk very well or that he'll have tail feathers. Poor boy.

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  11. I hope Mick is okay. He sounds like a tough old bird, in the best way. Right now I need a Mick.

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  12. how is mick today. i hate guns but i'd shoot anything that came into my yard and hurt one of my pets.

    xxalainaxx

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    1. Well, I have to say that if Mr. Moon found that dog in our yard I absolutely know what the outcome would be. I really hope that does not happen.

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  13. If I had a dog that attacked any living thing besides a fly I would put it down. Haters gonna hate me but I don’t care. There is a 10 year old girl in my community that was just attacked by two pit bulls and all but tire her arm off. The owner gathered the dogs and put them in her car and drove off. Thankfully the neighbor got the license plate number and the dogs were put down. She said that they were “good family pets”. Fuck! Yeah, they might not attack family members but they will go after chickens or small children. What did the owner say? Do you want me to come down there and talk to him? Because I wil.

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    1. The owner still hasn't contacted Glen. Either he's afraid or else he's just flicking it off as a no-biggie. I am sure that Glen won't let it go, though.
      There is such an outpouring of support and defense of pit bulls and all I can say is that I have raised pit bulls from pups and I KNOW that they can be the most loyal and loving of family pets BUT that if something sets them off for any reason, you just can't get them to stop attacking. They also seem to have less of a pain response than other dogs and incredibly powerful jaws. That is what they were bred for. Bull baiting. Fighting. And I hate that because they CAN be so sweet. But yeah- any dog that attacks a child or even a chicken just can't be trusted. Ever again.
      And by the way, Birdie. I adore you.

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  14. We were once given a Male Collie who had become a Chicken Killer on the Farm he was on. Away from Chickens he was docile and wouldn't even kill Sparrows and such that stole his kibbles and perched on his head! I think some breeds of Dogs do have a primal urge to hunt certain things even if they are Pets, but the Owner should be more vigilant. I am so sorry and Mick is a Hero defending his flock like he did so none were killed!

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    1. It's a very sad situation and I don't know yet what the outcome is going to be. And it's just ridiculous that I should have to keep my chickens cooped up in my own yard 365 days a year on the off chance that a killer dog is going to escape his yard and come and kill my birds. NO! And my chickens, by the way, never go to his yard. They keep to the boundaries for the most part.

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  15. Last fall our young dog followed a tractor to the neighbours' and was soon seen eating a dead alpaca. The neighbour shot and killed our dog. Here in farm country, dogs that kill livestock don't live long. - Kate

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    1. Oh god. That's awful. But alpacas are extremely expensive, aren't they? And yeah, around here the dog would have probably been shot too if the owner of any dead livestock caught it eating the body.
      So sad in all of the aspects.

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  16. Christ. I would put my beloved sweet (hypothetical) pit bulks down if they attacked anyone. Your neighbours should be paying for expensive, extensive fencing and continuing to try and rehome their dog. It's deeply unfair. Its not OK! I hope Mick makes it through.

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Tell me, sweeties. Tell me what you think.